Anita Sarkeesian’s Body Measurements, Including Bra Size

Anita Sarkeesian Bra Size

Biography

Anita Sarkeesian’s body measurements are all here! Check out her height, weight, shoe size, dress size, bra size and more!

Blogger, YouTuber, and media critic best known as the mind behind the Feminist Frequency blog and YouTube channel. Her work is largely focused in the portrayal of women in the media, particularly video games, and has been featured in prestigious publications like The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in communication studies from the University of California, Northridge and went on to achieve her master’s in social and political thought from York University.

She has served as an advisor for Silverstring Media and as a judge for the Games for Change Awards. She gained significant media attention for sexist harassment online, termed “GamerGate,” after the announcement of her Tropes vs. Women in Video Games project on Kickstarter.

Her parents are Armenians who emigrated from Iraq to Canada in the 1970s.

In 2014, she appeared on an episode of Stephen Colbert’s The Colbert Report discussing GamerGate and gender inclusivity in video games.

Body Measurements Table

All body measurements you might be interested in can be found in the table below. For example height, weight and dress size.

HeightN/A
WeightN/A
Cup Size (US)Unknown
Bra Size (US)N/A
Shoe Size (US)N/A
Body ShapeN/A
Dress Size (US)N/A
Breasts-Waist-Hips (Inches)N/A
Breasts-Waist-Hips (cm)N/A
Implants or Natural (Breasts)N/A

Quotes

I was frustrated with how academia tended to present feminist theory in disconnected or inaccessible ways. I wanted to try and bring a sociological feminist lens to the limited and limiting representations of women in the media and then share that with other young women of my generation. YouTube was the perfect medium.

Online harassment, especially gendered online harassment, is an epidemic. Women are being driven out; they’re being driven offline. This isn’t just in gaming. This is happening across the board online, especially with women who participate in or work in male-dominated industries.

There’s a toxicity within gaming culture, and also in tech culture, that drives this misogynist hatred, this reactionary backlash against women who have anything to say, especially those who have critiques or who are feminists.

The notion that gaming was not for women rippled out into society, until we heard it not just from the games industry, but from our families, teachers and friends. As a consequence, I, like many women, had a complicated, love-hate relationship with gaming culture.

There are people I’ve blocked for a long time who will still respond to every single person that replies positively to me on Twitter. I have quite a few cyber-stalkers like that.

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